FreeWeldingForum.com 
Welding Forum Community presented by LONGEVITY
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: Steel Spheres

  1. #1

    Steel Spheres

    Hello, Not sure if I'm posting this in the correct thread but I was wondering if anyone who views this thread could help me find out where I could find/purchase mild steel, metal spheres around 24" to 48" in diameter? If possible, the thickness can be 3/16" or 1/4". They could even be hemispheres. Or, suggestions on fabricating a sphere, which I have no experience with. I have only found Chinese manufacturing of these spheres on line and they require minimum quantities of 10 be purchased and I'm sure the shipping costs would be astronomical. Looking to make a custom, plasma cut fire-pit for my neighbor who showed me a picture of one from on line. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    Good WELDORS do it in all positions with 100% penetration!

    Longevity ProMTS-200
    Longevity 200SX
    Thermal Arc 95S

  2. #2
    Senior Member Kevin Caron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Phoenix Arizona in the shadows of Camelback Mountain
    Posts
    333
    That size is normally custom order.

    I have never found them in stock anywhere.

    Look for a company that does metal spinning.

    If they can't help they may know who can.

    Make sure you are sitting down for the price!!!
    ProMTS 200 Everlast PowerTig 255ext MigWeld 140 ForceCut 60I ForceCut 42i AHP Alpha Tig 200x

  3. #3
    Hi Kevin,

    Thanks for the help and advice. I will look up some spinning companies and find out how much they charge. I'm sure it will be crazy expensive!
    Good WELDORS do it in all positions with 100% penetration!

    Longevity ProMTS-200
    Longevity 200SX
    Thermal Arc 95S

  4. #4
    I have a friend who makes armor for a living and he makes kinda spherical stuff all the time. I wonder there are youtube video's on how to make a helmet or something similar. Also Mythbusters made a rounded torpedo shell using hydro forming. They made an outline of the shape they wanted out of thick steel and then put a thin piece of steel under the outline and pump in water with a high pressure pump from a pressure washer.

    Hydro Forming a tuned pipe for a two stroke engine.
    Hydroforming - YouTube
    Longevity LC-520D (ordered, Delivered, works great)
    Longevity Pro-Black Welding helmet, works great
    Pexto 137 shear (my latest toy)

    Personal website
    www.howhardcanitbe.tv

    Where I work.
    www.roadinosaur.com
    www.mattsrepair.com

  5. #5
    Just a thought, I know there would be a little fire but if it doesn't have to be perfect maybe build a paper mache ball with a balloon then use 1/8" rod to build a frame or half frame then wrap with sheet metal. I have no idea if this would work because I have tried it but if you can use this go for it.

  6. #6
    Thanks for the advice and information. I'm thinking I may go the metal spinning route. I also found some old school buoys, but they may be too heavy and expensive to have shipped in from the coast. I will be continuing to check other things, I do appreciate your help though.
    Good WELDORS do it in all positions with 100% penetration!

    Longevity ProMTS-200
    Longevity 200SX
    Thermal Arc 95S

  7. #7
    Metal spinning will leave a flat on the bottom where they are held onto the pattern, you may have quite a time rounding them out.
    Units owned Longevity PROmts 200

    Force Cut LP80 plasma cutter
    Longevity auto dark welding helmet

    Atlas 10x36" lathe
    Craftsman 5HP 30 Gal compressor
    Home made CNC router/plasma/hot wire foam cutting, 3D printing table powered by Longevity Force Cut LP80
    Home built aluminum foundry, HF 4x6 bandsaw

  8. #8
    Honestly, I'd find and bother someone with a deep throated english wheel (Or take a crack at making one) and a good hammer set / power hammer, and settle for the best results that can be wheeled out reasonably. If you're dead set on a perfect sphere, they may wind up having to do it in 2 halves made up of pie cuts. Less spherical lends itself much better to wheeling out in a single sheet. Just a matter of even rotation while wheeling, and staying within the steel's limits.

    Best case, it'll cost you a case of beer and materials if you've got a buddy with gear. Worst case, you'll be paying 2 gentlemen with burly forearms to push a big sheet of steel back and forth for a decent while (more if you're going for the full round).

    If you're having trouble finding people, you might luck out on one of the aluminum aircraft guys knowing steel.

    Hope it helps. ^_^ Have any sketches?


    (quick edit)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZLJhdKPwfw
    Last edited by Nick; 06-16-2013 at 10:42 PM.
    Full hand tool assortment, collecting sheet metal hammers/dollies, more time than money.

  9. #9
    Hi Gadget and Nick, I don't mind if it has a flat bottom, as it is going to be a fire pit. I may go the "pie" route, as it seems to be the easiest method for a prototype. I found information about finding a beach ball that has all of the crescents on them, and cutting them apart. Instant template! Thanks for the advice and ideas, I really appreciate the feedback.
    Good WELDORS do it in all positions with 100% penetration!

    Longevity ProMTS-200
    Longevity 200SX
    Thermal Arc 95S

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by BMor View Post
    Hi Gadget and Nick, I don't mind if it has a flat bottom, as it is going to be a fire pit. I may go the "pie" route, as it seems to be the easiest method for a prototype. I found information about finding a beach ball that has all of the crescents on them, and cutting them apart. Instant template! Thanks for the advice and ideas, I really appreciate the feedback.
    That'd absolutely work. In fact it's how the E-Wheel guys would go about visualising it (I'd assume). Pie cut, then shrink the edges / stretch the centers to bring it to round. You could slip roll / bend the pie cuts over your knee/tree trunk to get the desired shape and get to welding - the natural shrink would likely help. It'd be angular at the joints, but a starting point for sure. Try a test run with a beer can / thinnest scrap you've got. (I've got a near perfect dome shaped bottle cap I did with multitool pliers around here somewhere. lol )

    Another option - larger sections shaped to leave a void in the center. shaped / welded, you could then fill with thicker plate and ventilate for airflow. Think shapes like on a "Simon" toy

    .Name:  Simon.jpg
Views: 215
Size:  40.0 KB
    Last edited by Nick; 07-03-2013 at 08:56 PM.
    Full hand tool assortment, collecting sheet metal hammers/dollies, more time than money.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •