FreeWeldingForum.com 
Welding Forum Community presented by LONGEVITY
Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Article: Submerged Arc Welding......Snorkel and Fins not Required

  1. #1

    Thumbs up Article: Submerged Arc Welding......Snorkel and Fins not Required

    Submerged Arc Welding......Snorkel and Fins not Required

    Submerged arc welding is a mystery to many people. We hear the word submerged and instantly think of water. The only thing liquid is the weld puddle submerged under a pile of granular flux. This is the only arc welding process that we can do without an arc welding hood. The process is a cousin of gas metal arc welding and flux core arc welding. This welding process has the unique distinction of being one of the ones with the highest deposition rate. The welding head that incorporates both the wire, contact tip, and granular flux hopper is also unique to this process.

    In submerged arc welding a pile of granular flux is laid down ahead of the wire along the weld joint. Using the feed rolls in the wire feeder, the wire is driven through a contact tip and down into the granular flux pile. The wire strikes the metal surface under the granular flux and the arc is initiated. The arc causes the granular flux around the molten puddle under the wire to become liquid and float on the surface of the puddle similar to flux core arc welding or shielded metal arc welding. The name comes from the fact the arc is going on underneath or submerged in the granular flux pile. Additionally, because the arc is under the pile of flux, the operator does not see a bright light nor do they need an arc welding hood. Usually the process is moved along the weld joint using a weld manipulator or welding positioner.

    Submerged arc welding is done using a constant voltage power source similar to that used for gas metal arc welding and flux core arc welding. Submerged arc welding can also be done with a constant current power source like that used for shielded metal arc welding and gas tungsten arc welding. Submerged arc welding utilizes a coil of wire and a wire feeder similar to gas metal arc welding and flux core arc welding. Submerged arc welding does not require gas like gas metal arc welding. Submerged arc welding does use flux similar to flux core arc welding. Submerged arc welding can operate in the semi automatic and automatic modes. By using specific combinations of wire and flux types, the welding engineer can provide specific material properties. This process can also be done using more than one wire at a time, which ads to its reputation to high deposition rates.

    The process can be used on a wide range of thicknesses. It excels on thicker materials where it's ability to pour down pounds per hour can lay down some impressive welds. It is used primarily for ferrous or iron based metals. It can produce welds that penetrate an inch or more in one pass with a bead in excess of one inch in width. It is not uncommon to use in excess on 1000 amperes when doing submerged arc welding on thick materials. Power sources may be combined to get the required amperage too.

    The process is different compared to other process that use flux. The unmelted granular flux left in the pile can be recycled into the feed hopper and reapplied. Also, vendors collect the melted used flux for regrinding and reuse in this and other welding products. Submerged arc welding is not right for every application. In general, there needs to be enough welding required to justify the additional equipment, tooling and setup needed for the process. If you ever get a chance to operate the submerged arc welding process, dive right in, just leave your snorkel and fins at home!

    Check out the Longevity website (www.longevity-inc.com) or YouTube channel (www.youtube.com/longevitywelding) for more details and information about equipment for different welding and cutting processes. Longevity has the right machine for your exact application, so take a look and choose what is the best fit for your materials, product and needs.

  2. #2
    forgot to mention it call only be done in the FLAT position reason for the need for a weld positioner
    I Ran a sub arc machine at AJT a prior employer
    Ahp 200x tig acdc
    forcecut 42i
    Miller xmt350
    Lincoln LN-25
    Victor oxy/acetylene/
    Bunch of tools of the trade to much to list
    http://instagram.com/weldor_wes/

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by WookieWelding View Post
    forgot to mention it call only be done in the FLAT position reason for the need for a weld positioner
    I Ran a sub arc machine at AJT a prior employer
    That must have been pretty cool to do. I'm going to try to find a youtube on this. I never realized you didn't need a welding helmet.
    Is it OK to want to break something just so that you can weld it back together?

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •