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Thread: Why use Skip Welds in Welding and Fabrication?

  1. #1

    Why use Skip Welds in Welding and Fabrication?

    Why use Skip Welds in Welding and Fabrication?

    Skip welds or what some people call intermittent welds are a good tool to use in the right situation. Use of skip welds can reduce distortion, speed up production, reduce costs and reduce weight. Sometimes every lineal inch of joint need not be welded. Certain components or weld joints require 100 percent welding. When that is not the case, we might consider the use of skip welds. Skip welds are welds that are not completely welded the entire length. A segment of the joint is welded followed by a segment not welded. This alternating of welded and not welded segments continues along the joint as needed.

    Skip welds are defined by a specific length of weld, and a pitch dimension. The pitch is defined as the center to center distance between the welded segments. Too often the pitch is mistakenly thought to be the length of the unwelded segment as opposed to the center to center distance between welds.

    If we have to produce a full penetration weld in a butt joint, skip welds are not an option. If we have to produce a pipe weld that has to retain air or gas pressure, skip welds are not an option. If we have to produce a weld that has to contain or seal a liquid type joint, skip welds are not an option. These are but a few examples of when we cannot use skip welds.

    A flat bar attached to a cat walk as a toe board is a good use for skip welds. A stiffener attached to the back of a large flat surface is a good use for skip welds. Any tee or lap joint fillet weld that does not require full strength is also a good choice for skip welds.

    Skip welds reduce distortion by reducing the amount of overall weld required, thus reducing the amount of heat input. Reducing the amount welding also reduces the shrinkage that occurs from welding.

    Production speeds can increase because not all of the joint is required to be welded. If the amount of welding is reduced to as much as half there is a chance to double production speeds.

    The weight of a part can be reduced if the amount of weld applied is reduced. Skip welds are a great tool to reduce the amount weld required, and in the process reducing weight of the part. A specific welding pattern called staggered skip welds is a good way to maintain strength and reduce weight. In staggered skip welds, the weld on the near side of the joint is welded opposite an unwelded section on the opposite side of the joint.

    Finally, reducing the amount of weld by using skips can reduce costs. Cost savings are seen in reduced, weld filler metal, electrical power, shielding gas and labor just to name a few. On the other hand, there are increased costs associated with skip welds in the area of labor too. Layout of the skip welds prior to welding adds to the labor and time required to prep the joint for welding. Cost savings, reduced distortion, reduced weight and increased production speeds can be had if skip welds are used in the correct application.

    Check out the Longevity website (www.longevity-inc.com) or YouTube channel (www.youtube.com/longevitywelding) for more details and information about equipment for different welding and cutting processes. Longevity has the right machine for your exact application, so take a look and choose what is the best fit for your materials, product and needs.Why use Skip Welds in Welding and Fabrication?

  2. #2
    Hi Rebeckam and welcome to the forum. We like pictures here so be sure to include some showing your work. Be sure to post a bit about yourself in the introduce yourself section so we can get to know you. Also, keep an eye out for the next contest here. The odds of winning a great new Longevity machine are very good.
    Dan
    Units owned Longevity PROmts 200

    Force Cut LP80 plasma cutter
    Longevity auto dark welding helmet

    Atlas 10x36" lathe
    Craftsman 5HP 30 Gal compressor
    Home made CNC router/plasma/hot wire foam cutting, 3D printing table powered by Longevity Force Cut LP80
    Home built aluminum foundry, HF 4x6 bandsaw

  3. #3
    Senior Member BucketObolts's Avatar
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    Jun 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gadget View Post
    Hi Rebeckam and welcome to the forum. We like pictures here so be sure to include some showing your work. Be sure to post a bit about yourself in the introduce yourself section so we can get to know you. Also, keep an eye out for the next contest here. The odds of winning a great new Longevity machine are very good.
    Dan
    Pretty sure she works for Longevity

    Welcome anyway Rebeckam.
    Scott
    Lincoln 135
    HTP 221 DV

  4. #4
    Pretty good guess. Simon didn't give me a heads up.
    Units owned Longevity PROmts 200

    Force Cut LP80 plasma cutter
    Longevity auto dark welding helmet

    Atlas 10x36" lathe
    Craftsman 5HP 30 Gal compressor
    Home made CNC router/plasma/hot wire foam cutting, 3D printing table powered by Longevity Force Cut LP80
    Home built aluminum foundry, HF 4x6 bandsaw

  5. #5
    LOL. I kinda figured you missed it too gadget when I read the Longevity commercial at the end of her post!
    Just Sensible Concepts
    *Longevity Weldall 160PI (technically it's not mine but it is on MY inventory for my shop at work)
    Lincoln Weldanpower 200
    Lincoln Pro Mig 180
    Lincoln AC225

  6. #6
    I have used the tack hard pause and resume method before when I was welding something that was either thin or that I needed maximum penetration on but didn't want the base metal to overheat and cause distortion. Not sure what a proper name for it is but I do know it works and produces a REALLY nice stacked pattern that looks good. Kinda my version of mig like tig especially if it is in a place that will be quite visible in the finished product.
    Just Sensible Concepts
    *Longevity Weldall 160PI (technically it's not mine but it is on MY inventory for my shop at work)
    Lincoln Weldanpower 200
    Lincoln Pro Mig 180
    Lincoln AC225

  7. #7
    Well, she IS new to the forum so Gadget's post is half relevant! Just pulling your chain, Gadget.
    Is it OK to want to break something just so that you can weld it back together?

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