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Thread: Propane tank re-use.

  1. #11
    Nice tips. Never thought about using TSP. You guys have got me thinking now. I've got a propane tank that's no good to me anymore ....
    Is it OK to want to break something just so that you can weld it back together?

  2. #12
    For those whom did not know the smaller propane tanks (like BBQ grill tanks) have a safety in the valve so if the valve is open and not connected gas will not come out. The male part of the connecter sticks in the valve and opens the safety then gas can come out only when it’s connected.
    I have in the past use big propane tanks for air compressor tanks, but you must clean them to get the stink out. That stuff they use will turn your stomach it’s used as a human leak detector.
    The tanks are rated to about 250 PSI. Another good small tank is a Freon tank I have used them as gas tanks on VW Trikes I built.
    Have fun
    Tom
    Miller Mig
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    DIY CNC table for plasma/routing CandCNC DTHC-IV Electronics
    metal lathe
    small milling machine
    Powder coating oven
    2 bead rollers
    small shop
    ect, ect

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by acourtjester View Post
    For those whom did not know the smaller propane tanks (like BBQ grill tanks) have a safety in the valve so if the valve is open and not connected gas will not come out. The male part of the connecter sticks in the valve and opens the safety then gas can come out only when it’s connected.
    I have in the past use big propane tanks for air compressor tanks, but you must clean them to get the stink out. That stuff they use will turn your stomach it’s used as a human leak detector.
    The tanks are rated to about 250 PSI. Another good small tank is a Freon tank I have used them as gas tanks on VW Trikes I built.
    Have fun
    Tom
    Yes, and there is a relief screw on the side that you can back out SLOWLY and once the pressure gets down to a manageable state you can remove completely to relieve all the pressure. After the pressure is relieved, you can remove the valve fitting completely using a pipe wrench. If the pipe wrench won't fit over the valve because of the handle on the top of those smaller tanks you can remove the handle from them using a phillips head screwdriver and then fabricate a removal tool from a piece of flat metal that will cradle the valve top. Once you get the removal tool made and check to make sure it fits, you can then use it by torquing the pipe wrench on it. Sometimes you have to put a chain through the handle of the tank to hold it still cause it is difficult to hold if it is in very tight. I remove the valve and then proceed with cleaning using dish detergent or tsp and repeat a few times until it doesn't have any "odor" (rotten egg smell which is added to the propane so it can be detected by humans... otherwise, gas could be leaking and you wouldn't know it).
    Just Sensible Concepts
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