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Thread: Does 7018 really require special storage?

  1. #21
    He left out the part about actual strength. It isnt just tensile, it is tensile and ductility. 7018 is far more ductile then 7014, and has the same tensile strength, hence in actual applications, its stronger. Also, if you read the tests I posted, you would see that a damp 7018 still takes almost 2x the hammer blows to break... A hot one was over 25. 7014 was 10. He is just going by the book, not how things actually work.
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  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by deereman75 View Post
    He left out the part about actual strength. It isnt just tensile, it is tensile and ductility. 7018 is far more ductile then 7014, and has the same tensile strength, hence in actual applications, its stronger. Also, if you read the tests I posted, you would see that a damp 7018 still takes almost 2x the hammer blows to break... A hot one was over 25. 7014 was 10. He is just going by the book, not how things actually work.
    I was surprised that the MIG weld was stronger than any of the stick welds. Didn't really get a clear idea on how that could be. Runs a bit contrary to much of what I've read so far.
    Is it OK to want to break something just so that you can weld it back together?

  3. #23
    lol hammer blows is not how to test weld strength roll eyes
    a tensile pull or guided bend test or a sharpie test or even a fatigue test all done by a machine that is calibrated so you get REAL data to be able to compare the 2 variables
    I am with stan on his statement LOHI rods are kept at temp and only out for a allotted time to prevent hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen under bead cracking
    kind of pointless to buy 7018 and not maintain it properly and get it's benefits might as well use 7014 then
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  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by WookieWelding View Post
    lol hammer blows is not how to test weld strength roll eyes a tensile pull or guided bend test or a sharpie test or even a fatigue test all done by a machine that is calibrated so you get REAL data to be able to compare the 2 variables I am with stan on his statement LOHI rods are kept at temp and only out for a allotted time to prevent hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen under bead cracking kind of pointless to buy 7018 and not maintain it properly and get it's benefits might as well use 7014 then
    Since I'm just starting out, I'm not quite committed to making special storage for 7018 rods. Not sure if keeping them near the furnace in the winter and near sunlight during the summer will do it. 7018 is most economical in my area if I buy 5lb at a time. Hard to gauge how long that would last me.
    Is it OK to want to break something just so that you can weld it back together?

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by undercut View Post
    Since I'm just starting out, I'm not quite committed to making special storage for 7018 rods. Not sure if keeping them near the furnace in the winter and near sunlight during the summer will do it. 7018 is most economical in my area if I buy 5lb at a time. Hard to gauge how long that would last me.
    It will not hurt to try as many different types of rod, and keep on burning often to learn...!...

    -Ian
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  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by crabber View Post
    It will not hurt to try as many different types of rod, and keep on burning often to learn...!... -Ian
    I know and I appreciate your suggestion ... just short on cash at the moment. Saving up for a welder at the moment so consumables are almost secondary. Almost as as much as I might think a new welder might be attractive to look at, I guess I'll need electrodes to actually do anything!
    Is it OK to want to break something just so that you can weld it back together?

  7. #27
    40 to 50 years of welding… retired bridge builder… doesn't make a dang. The deal is this, 70 ksi as welded... Break tests are way too prone to outside variables to rely on. Show me non-destructive testing, chemical composition, and alloys. The filler in BOTH the 7018 AND the 7014 rods are BOTH (get that?) BOTH 70 ksi as welded. That's like saying that tig with er70s-2 is stronger than stick with 7024 rods. Neither is stronger, as they both WILL yield at 70 ksi. Hate to be a wet blanket for ya, but there it is. Ask your retired bridge welder this, do they still allow dt testing on bridge parts? Nope, it's all ut tested now. Sonogram, X-ray, and the likes. Now, I am not striking the old school methods, however, old school ain't today. Ask your bridge welder if they were allowed to use rods that were unsealed? Also ask if they even allow 7018 anymore, cause the last I checked it went seismic about 5 years ago. 8018, 9018, and FCAW process.
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  8. #28
    Don't want to cause a fuss everyone. Just want some opinions on whether I should keep 7018 or 7014's in my stock. Can only afford one at the moment .... don't really want to make an active (heated) storage compartment for 7018 rods. Not doing anything structural but if I do get 7018s, I'll store them in an airtight container with desiccant and in a warm environment like in the furnace room.
    Is it OK to want to break something just so that you can weld it back together?

  9. #29
    You will find the 7014's are much easier to run and strike for a begginer. I understand that money is an issue, however, you should run all kinds of rods, even rods from different manufacturers will vary in how they weld. In my professional opinion as a welding instructor and cwi, you NEED to be able to run all classes of rods as each has its place. Don't limit yourself! If I were to stock only 2 classes, it would be 6010 and 7018. Virtually any project can be accomplished with that combo.
    Torchmate 5 x 10 custom built CNC table
    6 (each) Thermadyne 252i mig/ stick/ tig
    Thermal Dynamics a-60 automated cutter
    Thermal cutmaster 52 handheld cutter
    '07 pro300 miller
    '08 275 trailblazer miller
    '99 250 trailblazer
    12vs extreme suitcase feeder
    2 (each) xr-a 50 foot push-pull feeders (for aluminum mig)
    800 ton break
    400 ton shear
    MM350p
    xmt 304
    (do i REALLY need to keep going?)

    nothing fancy, just a few hot glue guns for metal

    www.sicfabrications.com

  10. #30
    I agree with Stan, that's pretty much all I keep in my box.
    Steve
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