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Thread: Just scored a SS

  1. #11
    Junior Member ceej's Avatar
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    Here's a shot of my Valiant Engine

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    I should take something a bit more current and complete sometime.

    CJ

  2. #12
    Sweet! you put some money into that one. I need to take a gander through the ss forum and see what kind of fuel mileage people are tweeking out of these & how.
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  3. #13
    Junior Member ceej's Avatar
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    Indeed. That one was getting 24 mpg until I made it a long rod stroker. The poor little 390 Holley couldn't feed it anymore.
    It gets right at 20 now.
    With a pickup like yours, the good numbers I've heard, that I trust, are 21 freeway, and about 15 in town. Some folks do it with 1 bbl carbs, others do it with four barrels.

    With the 4 bbl, freeway mileage can be pretty darn good, but in town it's going to tank. Something like 12 or so. The real trick is exhaust. Getting the restrictive stock "noodle" pipe off of there frees things up to breath.

    Now here's the deal, are you going to run the Automatic transmission, or your three speed?
    The crank register size changed in 1968. There is extra work involved in running an early transmission with a late engine. That goes up exponentially running an early engine with a late transmission. The crank register has to be opened up to allow the later tranmission's converter to work. My lathe isn't big enough for that. The forged crank weighs 75# and is close to 30 inches long.

    Almost every engine part from 1960 to 1986 can interchange, except for doing hydraulic valve train from a late engine to solid and vice versa. That requires a lot of careful parts matching. There is no oil gallery feeding the lifters in either engine. The lifters in the hydraulic engines is fed oil from the top. Oil in the rocker shaft flows out through the rockers, down through the pushrods, and pumps the lifters up that way. It was how Mopar got around having to come up with a new block. I think AMC did it too.
    The other major change was the cast crank engines. The rod journals are narrower, so cast cranks can't run forged crank rods.

    Some folks want to run hydraulic. I'm not interested, because there aren't any performance cams available. I run an Erson RV15M RDP. (Reverse Dual Pattern.) The RV10M Is equivelent to the early Marine cam, or the late car cam. It is an excellent choice in an economy build, and will provide a lot of spunk to your pickup. The early cam is much milder, but doesn't help the 225 where it needs it. The head and cam was designed around the 170 Cubic Inch engine.
    The most important part of a tune up on a slant six is the valve lash. If you haven't done it, make sure you knock that out before you give up on your old slant six. Most of them will handle 250k miles before they start having real difficulty. With the new oils available today, considerably more is possible, given that the timing set is replaced after 100 k. The truck replacement is a dual row roller. They are available from various places, and we just had a group buy on them on dot org.
    The induction hardened seats have a very thin hardening layer on even the late engines. Your 64 doesn't have them at all. That means your valves are receding when you operate at mid to high throttle settings. That tightens the lash, and the engine runs terrible. Having a valve job done to the head can breath life back into the old girl. Stab that electronic ignition system into it from the '73, or look up the HEI conversion and have an excellent ignition that will work much better. If you use the 73 ignition, everything must come over from the donor car. The ballast resistor is not the same.

    CJ
    Last edited by ceej; 04-01-2011 at 01:37 AM.

  4. #14
    Ha! I like the quad ceej!

    Have you done any work having the cams re-ground?
    rc

  5. #15
    Junior Member ceej's Avatar
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    I have a couple bump sticks from Oregon Cam Grinding. One is an experimental RDP, the other is a fairly straight forward grind running in the .541ish lift range.
    The cores had bad fuel pump cams, but I run a fuel cell and electric pump anyway.
    Most of the time I go with new. The failure point in performance slant six builds is the oil pump drive gear, which takes the cam gear out when it dies.

    CJ

  6. #16
    Thanks CJ, man you give a guy a lot to think about lol. I think I'm gonna run the auto for now & just fab a floor shifter. I'll try to pull it out as 1 unit and install it that way. I have lots more room in my truck to work also.

    While it's out I'm gonna remove all the leaf springs except for the main ones and bag it, then shorten the frame in the rear so the rear wheels are centered between cab and rear bumper. I have taken a ton of weight off this truck and will shave a few more pounds when done.

    One more thing, my truck has a HUGE drive shaft, will I be able to still use it?
    Millermatic 140
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    Craftsman 15" floor model drill press
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    Porter Cable 60 gallon compressor
    Clarke parts washer
    Craftsman 10" table saw
    Ryobi 8 1/2" sliding miter saw
    Homemade bench top english wheel
    Homemade plannishing hammer
    Tons of hand power tools
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  7. #17
    Senior Member arandall's Avatar
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    Ceej:
    That looks like a really nice engine. It seems like you really know your Mopars. It's nice to have such a wide variety of talent and knowledge from people on the forum. It's why I stick around.
    Cheers,
    Art R.

    Longevity LS200-PI multi-purpose cutter/welder,
    Miller 180 Auto-Set MIG,
    Custom 5hp compressor,

  8. #18
    Junior Member ceej's Avatar
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    The driveshaft will need to be the right length. You will need the slip yoke from the transmission, though you can buy them new. Just take everything to the driveline shop. Tell them what your doing and have the measurements on hand. The driveline shop you have shorten and balance it should be able to take care of that should it be needed.
    The automatic transmission may need some custom fabrication for a transmission mount.

    In past lives I was into Ford FE's, Chevy Small Blocks, Fiats, Alfa Romeos and Jaguars.
    Wait.. Still have three Chevys, a Ford, an Alfa, a couple Bikes and a bucket full of Mopars... Still got a screw loose.

    CJ

    ---------- Post added at 10:10 PM ---------- Previous post was at 09:59 PM ----------

    Speedometer cable! Almost forgot! The early is different! snag that as well.

    Grab an external transmission cooler. Even if your radiator has a place for the transmission cooler lines to hook up, it probably has a bunch of crud in it that you won't want going through the automatic. Did I mention, grab the tranny cooler lines?

    Geeze. Haven't done an engine swap for months! I'm getting rusty. It's nice to have the donor car complete if you can swing it. That way you have it to pull parts off during the swap.
    If you get up to dot org, talk to DusterIdiot. He's the manual tranny guru. There are others up there as well.

    CJ

  9. #19
    I have the complete car sitting at my shop so I can scavenge everything I need.
    Millermatic 140
    Thermodynamics 190C plasma cutter
    Plasma Trace (custom built by me)
    Victor O/A torch HVAC size
    Craftsman 15" floor model drill press
    Craftsman 6" metal lathe
    Wilton horizontal band saw
    Porter Cable 60 gallon compressor
    Clarke parts washer
    Craftsman 10" table saw
    Ryobi 8 1/2" sliding miter saw
    Homemade bench top english wheel
    Homemade plannishing hammer
    Tons of hand power tools
    1500 sq ft shop
    & an over active imagination

  10. #20
    Junior Member ceej's Avatar
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    Perfect!

    Looked at the Volare photo without a beer in me... That's a reman 1920 Holley. What does the 1973 Carb look like?

    CJ

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