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Thread: Welding Horseshoes.

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    Senior Member Bluesman's Avatar
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    Welding Horseshoes.

    I've been working on some projects using horseshoes. Finished product looks good but it is often agravating trying to get the ground to work. I can have the ground connected to my welding table and I can weld on anything, put my shield down and try to strike the arc on the horseshoes and it is like I'm touching freakin plastic. I've even found it hard to get it to strike when I have the ground clamp directly on the horseshoe. Once it starts an arc, the welding of them is fairly easy but it is certainly hell getting started. I was curious about whether since I was using used horseshoes if it was the same kind of situation I had asked about concerning the drill stem/sucker rod in the fence thread. I know it isn't because they are dirty because I wire brushed them suckers till they were shiny.

    I'm gonna post up some pics of my horseshoe stuff in a day or so so I can get my 5 photos uploaded for the contest provided I get enough posts... I may have to sand bag them until a new contest starts if I run short on postsGreenSmoking
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    Senior Member SICFabrications's Avatar
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    sandbagging not aloud, sir! its against the unwritten rules laughingicon

    ive never tried to weld on horseshoes, i have 0 advice for ya there... but i am gonna ask.... what process and what machine settings are ya usin?
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    Senior Member arandall's Avatar
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    Were you using 7018's ?

    Art R.
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    Senior Member Bluesman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SICFabrications View Post
    sandbagging not aloud, sir! its against the unwritten rules laughingicon

    ive never tried to weld on horseshoes, i have 0 advice for ya there... but i am gonna ask.... what process and what machine settings are ya usin?
    Mig, solid wire, c-25, volts 23, wire speed 390

    They are about 3/16 thick, so, do you think I got the volts/wire speed right for that volt amp curve we were talking about the other day?

    ---------- Post added at 07:58 PM ---------- Previous post was at 07:57 PM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by arandall View Post
    Were you using 7018's ?

    Art R.
    No, I was using wire. These are decorative/art pieces and there would be WAY too much clean up with 7018's. They would be overkill I think.
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    Senior Member SICFabrications's Avatar
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    might back the wfs down to around 320 for 3/16.... voltage is about proper... you will be in short circuit transfer though.... and it might help ya with the striking thing too
    Torchmate 5 x 10 custom built CNC table
    6 (each) Thermadyne 252i mig/ stick/ tig
    Thermal Dynamics a-60 automated cutter
    Thermal cutmaster 52 handheld cutter
    '07 pro300 miller
    '08 275 trailblazer miller
    '99 250 trailblazer
    12vs extreme suitcase feeder
    2 (each) xr-a 50 foot push-pull feeders (for aluminum mig)
    800 ton break
    400 ton shear
    MM350p
    xmt 304
    (do i REALLY need to keep going?)

    nothing fancy, just a few hot glue guns for metal

    www.sicfabrications.com

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    Bluesman (08-29-2010)

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    Senior Member matteh99's Avatar
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    My guess is they have a layer of corrosion on them that isn't coming off with just brushing. With a wire brush you can get really rusty stuff polished but not really down to fresh metal. I would try actually grinding a spot on them. You don't need to do the whole thing just enough to get started.
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    Senior Member Bluesman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by matteh99 View Post
    My guess is they have a layer of corrosion on them that isn't coming off with just brushing. With a wire brush you can get really rusty stuff polished but not really down to fresh metal. I would try actually grinding a spot on them. You don't need to do the whole thing just enough to get started.
    They sure had a new metal shine to em. I was a little reluctant to put an actual grinding wheel on them because I didn't want to scuff up or erode away at the material. With the little curves and such on them it would be hard to grind them and they still have the same consistant shape. I'm open for suggestions if anybody has any experience or luck cleaning them other than a wire brush attachment on a high speed deWalt. LOL...

    BTW, I tried to sand and cement mixer trick someone else suggested as a "Hey why don't you try..." Lets just say that after quite a bit of usage of strong adjectives I decided that wasn't such a good idea. In theory it would work like polishing brass in a tumbler for reloading BUT in actuality they just get wedged between the paddles and the drum and end up either making an unbearable noise, getting bent, burning the belt off the mixer, or making the motor's overload protection trip... It wasn't pretty.
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    Try a flap wheel on an angle grinder, I've had good luck cleaning metal with them.
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    Bluesman (08-29-2010)

  12. #9
    Senior Member Bluesman's Avatar
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    I'll give it a try. Cleaning the flat part of them(part that fits against the hoof) isn't bad but the top (bottom if they are on the horse) is a little different because it is curved which isn't a problem for the flap disc BUT the nail grooves on the other hand, can't get the grinder in there. Also have an extremely difficult time getting the grinder on the inside of the curve as well. Maybe I could try a die grinder?
    Just Sensible Concepts
    *Longevity Weldall 160PI (technically it's not mine but it is on MY inventory for my shop at work)
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    Lincoln Pro Mig 180
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    Senior Member tjjolle's Avatar
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    Ive welded rusty horseshoes on all kinds of work. Usually its to function as some sort of handle, tie down, or something that serves function. I usually had a larger piece to ground to, but I never had problems getting spark. I agree with the suggestion to use a flap wheel to get a good ground. Even through a rusty surface my machines have always burned through (using 6011's).
    Quote Originally Posted by Bluesman View Post
    I've been working on some projects using horseshoes. Finished product looks good but it is often agravating trying to get the ground to work. I can have the ground connected to my welding table and I can weld on anything, put my shield down and try to strike the arc on the horseshoes and it is like I'm touching freakin plastic. I've even found it hard to get it to strike when I have the ground clamp directly on the horseshoe. Once it starts an arc, the welding of them is fairly easy but it is certainly hell getting started. I was curious about whether since I was using used horseshoes if it was the same kind of situation I had asked about concerning the drill stem/sucker rod in the fence thread. I know it isn't because they are dirty because I wire brushed them suckers till they were shiny.

    I'm gonna post up some pics of my horseshoe stuff in a day or so so I can get my 5 photos uploaded for the contest provided I get enough posts... I may have to sand bag them until a new contest starts if I run short on postsGreenSmoking
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