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Thread: What size 220V Wiring?

  1. #11
    Senior Member mountain eagle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arcamm View Post
    If your electician would only use 8, either it was a long run, he figured it would pull more than 30 amps on startup or he a bunch of 8 on his truck he needed to use up.
    Yup.... and or he's generally unfamiliar with welder stuff and knows that an easy upsize is good to do when in doubt.....
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  2. #12
    or he thought that maybe a 20 amp 110 along with a 30 amp 220 would be nice on that #8
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  3. #13
    Senior Member Cope's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arcamm View Post
    There are a lot of things that effect the size you should use, like the length and load type. A given wire size has a rating and 10 will carry 30 amps. If your run gets too long, you need to go up a size. It's OK to go too big, but not too small. You have to match the breaker to the wire size. You can use a 30amp or less on 10 wire, but not anything larger.

    If your electician would only use 8, either it was a long run, he figured it would pull more than 30 amps on startup or he a bunch of 8 on his truck he needed to use up.
    Welding machines are rated differently than standard appliances, and few electricians pay attention to this.
    4T or not 4T, that is the question.

    Miller Model 88 250 amp AC, Miller MM210, Hobart HH187, Longevity Force Cut 42i, Longevity Tigweld 200EX

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Cope View Post
    Welding machines are rated differently than standard appliances, and few electricians pay attention to this.
    Anything in particular to watch out for?

  5. #15
    Senior Member roberts56's Avatar
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    Perhaps this reply is kinda late already since Bdub has done his wiring and did success with his plasma. Anyway for my welders, I use a stranded no.10 wire connected to a 60 amps safety switch box. Current here in our country has always been 220 - 240 volts.
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  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by roberts56 View Post
    Perhaps this reply is kinda late already since Bdub has done his wiring and did success with his plasma. Anyway for my welders, I use a stranded no.10 wire connected to a 60 amps safety switch box. Current here in our country has always been 220 - 240 volts.
    I didn't keep any of my links and they would be for US standards anyway. There are some tables and such for length of run, amps, voltage and what voltage drop you be expected to experience. You don't typically want the voltage drop to drop too much but if you are starting with 240 (as opposed to 220), you've got a bit of buffer there and.

    I haven't looked into wire sizes since I rigged up my extension cord but 10 gauge wire for 60 amps sounds a bit thin. Of course, it depends on how long the run is and the duration of maximum amps you would be experiencing. Wouldn't want a fire like Gadget experienced when he was younger ....
    Is it OK to want to break something just so that you can weld it back together?

  7. #17
    THHN is rated for 40 amps, TW and UF is only rated to 30 for 10 gauge copper. You're headed for trouble if you try to push 60 amps.
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  8. #18
    The link to the calculator in this thread is a rough estimate and it does seem to indicate that for shorter runs, 10 gauge seems suitable for 60 amps but when you get down to specific wire, Gadget is right, 60 amps is a whole lot of amperage and if you are pulling it all for any period of time, be sure you are using an appropriately sized and sheathed cable.
    Is it OK to want to break something just so that you can weld it back together?

  9. #19
    Recently extended my Dad's small shop , so We ended up moving the welding equipment to the new side thus needed to extend the electrical also . Maybe overkill , but I ran 6/3 for the entire run of about 28' from sub panel to welder outlet . But that is the way I do stuff . I do it once , maybe overkill , but I don't have to go back and do it again Later .

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  10. #20
    Just out of curiosity Fred, What size wire was going to the sub panel you pulled from?
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