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Thread: Welding rod numbering and description

  1. #1
    Moderator Gadget's Avatar
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    Welding rod numbering and description

    Here is a link to a nice chart for rod numbering and the associated function of each type. I thought about copying the chart but wanted to be fair to the company that put this up so I'm just providing the link.
    Dan

    Technical Specifications - Stick Welding
    Last edited by Gadget; 01-03-2010 at 03:44 PM.
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    Senior Member frijoli's Avatar
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    I like this one better. It shows how to read the rod numbers


    AWS Classifications Explained

    The American Welding Society (AWS) numbering system can tell a welder quite a bit about a specific stick electrode including what application it works best in and how it should be used to maximize performance. With that in mind, let's take a look at the system and how it works.

    The prefix "E" designates an arc welding electrode. The first two digits of a 4-digit number and the first three digits of 5-digit number indicate tensile strength.
    For example, E6010 is a 60,000 psi tensile strength electrode while E10018 designates a 100,000 psi tensile strength electrode.

    E 60 1 "10" Electrode Tensile strength Position Type of Coating and Current

    The next to last digit indicates position. The "1" designates an all position electrode, "2" is for flat and horizontal positions only; while "3" indicates an electrode that can be used for flat, horizontal, vertical down and overhead. The last 2 digits taken together indicate the type of coating and the correct polarity or current to use. See chart below:
    Digit Type of Coating Welding Current
    10 High cellulose sodium DC+
    11 High cellulose potassium AC or DC+ or DC-
    12 High titania sodium AC or DC-
    13 High titania potassium AC or DC+
    14 iron powder titania AC or DC- or DC+
    15 low hydrogen sodium DC+
    16 low hydrogen potassium AC or DC+
    18 iron powder low hydrogen AC or DC+
    20 High iron oxide AC or DC+ or DC-
    22 High iron oxide AC or DC- 24 iron powder titania AC or DC- or DC+
    27 iron powder iron oxide AC or DC+ or DC-
    28 Low hydrogen potassium iron powder AC or DC+

    As a welder, there are certain electrodes that you will most likely see and use time and time again as you go about your daily operations. A DC machine produces a smoother arc. DC rated electrodes will only run on a DC welding machine. Electrodes which are rated for AC welding are more forgiving and can also be used with a DC machine. Here are some of the most common electrodes and how they are typically used:
    E6010
    DC only and designed for putting the root bead on the inside of a piece of pipe, this is the most penetrating arc of all. It is tops to dig through rust, oil, paint or dirt. It is an all-position electrode that beginning welders usually find extremely difficult, but is loved by pipeline welders world-wide. Lincoln 5P+ sets the standard in this category.
    E6011
    This electrode is used for all-position AC welding or for welding on rusty, dirty, less-than-new metal. It has a deep, penetrating arc and is often the first choice for repair or maintenance work when DC is unavailable. The most common Lincoln product is Fleetweld® 180 for hobby and novice users. Industrial users typically prefer Fleetweld 35.
    E6013
    This all-position, AC electrode is used for welding clean, new sheet metal. Its soft arc has minimal spatter, moderate penetration and an easy-to-clean slag. Lincoln Fleetweld® 37 is most common of this type.
    E7018
    A low-hydrogen, usually DC, all-position electrode used when quality is an issue or for hard-to-weld metals. It has the capability of producing more uniform weld metal, which has better impact properties at temperatures below zero. The Lincoln products are typically Jetweld® LH-78 or our new Excalibur® 7018.
    E7024
    Typically used to make a large weld downhand with AC in plate that is at least ¼" thick, but more commonly used for plate that is ½" and up. Lincoln has several electrodes in this category that are called Jetweld® 1, 2, or 3.
    Other Electrodes
    Although not nearly as common, an electrode may have additional numbers after it such as E8018-B2H4R. In this case, the "B2" indicates chemical composition of the weld metal deposit. The "H4" is the diffusible hydrogen designator, which indicates the maximum diffusible hydrogen level obtained with the product. And "R" stands for the moisture resistant designator to indicate the electrode's ability to meet specific low moisture pickup limits under controlled humidification tests.
    Last edited by frijoli; 01-03-2010 at 02:14 PM.

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    Senior Member bhardy501's Avatar
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    Great post. I keep 6010s and 7018s in my arsenal at all times.

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    Very informative I copied and pasted to a word doc for the future.............Thanks
    Dustin

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    Thanks guys,

    Man on the project had just bought a bunch of 6010 and I've told him he should have gotten 6011 to weld the drill pipe...
    Some people won't listen!

    I'll try again...

    Best
    rc

    How is it that magnetism within the pipe affects the 'weldability' ???
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    Thanks for posting those charts, very helpful I appreciate it. thaanks again jake

  9. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by beadboy View Post
    Thanks for posting those charts, very helpful I appreciate it. thaanks again jake
    X2 ob that
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    and a real welder comin sooner

  10. #8
    Senior Member SICFabrications's Avatar
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    some rods that were are using right now are'nt listed....... 7010 p-1 and 8010-g (also known as hippie rods) or HYPE and HYP+ they dig hard like the 6010's but with 70 and 80 ksi as welded (respectively)
    Torchmate 5 x 10 custom built CNC table
    6 (each) Thermadyne 252i mig/ stick/ tig
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    2 (each) xr-a 50 foot push-pull feeders (for aluminum mig)
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    (do i REALLY need to keep going?)

    nothing fancy, just a few hot glue guns for metal

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  11. #9
    Hay keep in mind that I'm new somewhat to all this,but was wondering if there is a chart like this for size of rod to thickness of metal.I know I have a general Idea,but a handy chart would help.

    Thanks,Gene
    HF-120 Amp Arc Welder
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    Welder comin SOON

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  12. #10
    Senior Member SICFabrications's Avatar
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    size of rod per thickness of metal.... hate to sound like a smarta$$ but a general rule of thumb for that is this: if you can fit a 1/8 rod, then use it, if you can fit a 5/32, then use it, if you can fit a 1/4 rod, then use that one (of course, depending on the capabilities of the operator and the machinery.... ive been known to use 5/32 6010 rods on 24 ga. sheet steel and ive been known to use 3/32 8018's on 2 inch thick plate.... it all depends on the job and speed requirements
    Torchmate 5 x 10 custom built CNC table
    6 (each) Thermadyne 252i mig/ stick/ tig
    Thermal Dynamics a-60 automated cutter
    Thermal cutmaster 52 handheld cutter
    '07 pro300 miller
    '08 275 trailblazer miller
    '99 250 trailblazer
    12vs extreme suitcase feeder
    2 (each) xr-a 50 foot push-pull feeders (for aluminum mig)
    800 ton break
    400 ton shear
    MM350p
    xmt 304
    (do i REALLY need to keep going?)

    nothing fancy, just a few hot glue guns for metal

    www.sicfabrications.com

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