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Welding threaded rod to the blade of a hockey skate



qlopp
02-02-2013, 04:36 PM
Hi, first time poster here. The title probably seems like a strange abstract, but let me explain.

I simply would like to be more educated as to the feasibility of this project before asking a welding shop to do it for me.

My plan involves making a non-structural, non-functioning item that will only serve a cosmetic purpose. The detail I am concerned with involves an ice skate "steel" (the replaceable metal blade of a hockey skate), which will be completely removed and separated from the rest of the skate; it is simply a 1/4" thick piece of metal, made from some variety of stainless steel. I need to bond a single attaching point or "post" of threaded rod to this steel in the middle of the blade so that the rod is perpendicular to the length of the blade. Further, imagine if either side of the blade were to be laid flat on a table, consider that table to be the plane I am going to reference; the threaded rod would be in the same plane as the imaginary table. The threads can be any major diameter in the range of 1/4" to 1/2" as long as they aren't too big to fit into the body of my project. 1/2" is probably pushing it, but the reason I'm including the possibility of a thicker fastener is that I would like to notch out the threaded rod or bolt with a flycut, so that this notch can be saddled over the thin dimension of the skate blade. The skate blade is 1/4" thich so that only leaves 1/8" of metal on each side if I use a 1/2" threaded rod. Once slotted, the welder could presumably weld both sides of the threaded rod in place, allowing the rod to be centered to the thin dimension of the blade. This is not 100% necessary as I could just cut a flat notch up one side of a threaded rod and have the welder weld it to one side of the skate blade, but the centered ideal would look better and probably be stronger.

The big question so I don't waste a welding professional's time babbling about things I don't understand: is this project possible given the blade is SS alloy?

Minor followup concerns:

Could the skate blade warp or become discolored significantly even if the welder is capable and careful?
What would be a good fastener type to use to make the welder's job easier? SS? Zinc coated steel? Phosphate coated steel?

Thanks for any advice.

Gadget
02-02-2013, 04:54 PM
Hi and welcome to the forum. We like pictures here so be sure to include some showing your work. Be sure to post a bit about yourself in the introduce yourself section so we can get to know you. Also, keep an eye out for the next contest here. The odds of winning a great new Longevity machine are very good.
You should easily be able to TIG weld the rod to the skate using either stainless filler or standard filler rod. Be sure the threaded rod is not zink coated, it won't weld clean and will give off toxic fumes. A good post flow and low heat should keep the area fairly clean and shiny, especially if using the SS rod. You could also try grinding the point of contact thinner on the skate giving you more material remaining on the threaded rod.
Dan

qlopp
02-02-2013, 07:01 PM
You should easily be able to TIG weld the rod to the skate using either stainless filler or standard filler rod. Be sure the threaded rod is not zink coated, it won't weld clean and will give off toxic fumes. A good post flow and low heat should keep the area fairly clean and shiny, especially if using the SS rod. You could also try grinding the point of contact thinner on the skate giving you more material remaining on the threaded rod.
Dan

Thanks for the tips, Dan. I'm sure those are excellent tips for the process and this will help me be less ignorant of the job when I consult with the welder. Since I'm supplying and modifying the bolt that will be the key concern on my end. Great point about crossing notches into the blade as well, that will make the joint stronger and also not require the welder to "guess" at a placement/jig angle. The notches can probably be cut with a fiberglass die grinder wheel and a steady hand. Perfection is not needed in strength and the weld beads should cover up slight gaps in fit.

WookieWelding
02-02-2013, 08:37 PM
you could use a carbon steel bolt or a stainless bolt ...
where are you located ?
and for this i would use GTAW then polish the blade post weld

undercut
02-03-2013, 12:07 AM
Welcome to the forum, qlopp. Good luck on your project.

qlopp
02-03-2013, 11:53 AM
you could use a carbon steel bolt or a stainless bolt ...
where are you located ?
and for this i would use GTAW then polish the blade post weld

Thanks for the bolt tip. I'm in Missouri.