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200dx vs. 160sx



BucketObolts
06-19-2012, 09:34 AM
Greetings all.
I am looking at getting a TIG machine in a few months (I hope). I am interested in a machine that is dual voltage as I don't have any 220V hook ups.
I am curious how well these do on 110V?
So far I have been using a Lincoln 135 mig machine with .030 flux. I have been please with the performance but not with all the clean up needed. Some of you might have seen some of my projects in the project section of this forum. So my thinking is if I have had good luck on a 110V wire feed I should have good luck on a 110V TIG machine. Am I pretty close assuming this or way out of the park?

Between the 200DX and the 160SX other than the 200 being DC only and the 160 having AC/DC what other differences is there? Looks like the 160SX is a fairly new machine only out for a few weeks. So far I have only welded stuff in the steel family. My luck is if I bought a DC only machine some aluminum projects would fall into my lap. :doh2
Does Longevity have any plans for other dual voltage TIG machines to be released in the next few months?

Any thoughts or help here would be appreciated.

undercut
06-19-2012, 11:01 AM
Greetings all.
I am looking at getting a TIG machine in a few months (I hope). I am interested in a machine that is dual voltage as I don't have any 220V hook ups.
I am curious how well these do on 110V?
So far I have been using a Lincoln 135 mig machine with .030 flux. I have been please with the performance but not with all the clean up needed. Some of you might have seen some of my projects in the project section of this forum. So my thinking is if I have had good luck on a 110V wire feed I should have good luck on a 110V TIG machine. Am I pretty close assuming this or way out of the park?

Between the 200DX and the 160SX other than the 200 being DC only and the 160 having AC/DC what other differences is there? Looks like the 160SX is a fairly new machine only out for a few weeks. So far I have only welded stuff in the steel family. My luck is if I bought a DC only machine some aluminum projects would fall into my lap. :doh2
Does Longevity have any plans for other dual voltage TIG machines to be released in the next few months?

Any thoughts or help here would be appreciated.

I'm very interested in the 160sx as well. I believe I read in another forum that Longevity might be introducing some more TIG machines in the coming weeks but that was pretty much all the detail there was in the post.

The 200dx is way more capable machine. It's got more power, better duty cycle, true AC balance, AC frequency control, up slope, down slope, pulse width, adjustable arc force and probably a bunch of other features. The two products are not priced for the same market. Hope this helps.

BucketObolts
07-10-2012, 06:38 PM
I thought the 200DX was DC only?




I'm very interested in the 160sx as well. I believe I read in another forum that Longevity might be introducing some more TIG machines in the coming weeks but that was pretty much all the detail there was in the post.

The 200dx is way more capable machine. It's got more power, better duty cycle, true AC balance, AC frequency control, up slope, down slope, pulse width, adjustable arc force and probably a bunch of other features. The two products are not priced for the same market. Hope this helps.

undercut
07-10-2012, 06:45 PM
I thought the 200DX was DC only?

I grabbed the following information straight from the website so I'm not sure if it up-to-date / accurate, etc.

Model: TigWeld 200DX AC/DC

AC TIG

Input Voltage: 1 Phase 220v/230v/240 ; 50/60Hz

No-Load Voltage: 70v

Base Current Adjusting Range: 20-200A

AC Balance: 10%-90%

AC Square Wave Frequency: 50-250Hz

Rated Duty Cycle: 60%

DC TIG


Pulse Current Adjusting Range: 5-200A

Rated Duty Cycle: 60%

Current Down-Slope Time: 0-10S

Base Current: 5-200A

Pulse Width Ratio: 0.1-0.9

Pulse Frequency: 0.2-300Hz

After Flow Time: 1-25S

Arc Starting Mode: High Frequency Arc Striking


DC MMA


No-Load Voltage: 70V

Base Current Adjusting Range: 5-160A

Rated Output Current: 160A

Rated Duty Cycle: 60%


Efficiency: >83%

Mass: 25kg

Dimensions: 26"x10"x15"

BucketObolts
07-10-2012, 06:49 PM
I might have a closer look at the 200DX.


I grabbed the following information straight from the website so I'm not sure if it up-to-date / accurate, etc.

Model: TigWeld 200DX AC/DC

AC TIG

Input Voltage: 1 Phase 220v/230v/240 ; 50/60Hz

No-Load Voltage: 70v

Base Current Adjusting Range: 20-200A

AC Balance: 10%-90%

AC Square Wave Frequency: 50-250Hz

Rated Duty Cycle: 60%

DC TIG


Pulse Current Adjusting Range: 5-200A

Rated Duty Cycle: 60%

Current Down-Slope Time: 0-10S

Base Current: 5-200A

Pulse Width Ratio: 0.1-0.9

Pulse Frequency: 0.2-300Hz

After Flow Time: 1-25S

Arc Starting Mode: High Frequency Arc Striking


DC MMA


No-Load Voltage: 70V

Base Current Adjusting Range: 5-160A

Rated Output Current: 160A

Rated Duty Cycle: 60%


Efficiency: >83%

Mass: 25kg

Dimensions: 26"x10"x15"

undercut
07-10-2012, 06:53 PM
Keep in mind the 200DX is a 220v machine only.

poodle
07-10-2012, 06:56 PM
No, it's AC/DC. I bought one during the March madness sale and love it. It has more knobs and stuff on it than I will ever learn to use. The pulse stuff is what I don't know if I will ever learn. I just came in from using it. On the cooker I built for my BIL the pin the grate swivels on was just a little sloppy. I was able to build it up just enough to take the sloop out with very little cleanup. I was able to lay down some very low beads with ease. If I had been using stick I would have had a lot of grinding to do. Sidebar, Man I Need A Lathe.

undercut
07-10-2012, 06:58 PM
Found this review by poodle in another thread:

http://www.longevity-inc.com/forum/customers-testimonials-plasma-cutter-welder-reviews/3639-200dx.html

Whoops, I see that poodle has already chimed in .... !

BucketObolts
07-10-2012, 07:42 PM
:elect: Looks like I meant to compare the 200D and the 160SX. Oops. Looking for a 110V machine with the 220V option.

poodle
07-10-2012, 07:46 PM
Scott, PM on the way.

BucketObolts
07-10-2012, 07:46 PM
Anyone use the 200D or the 160SX just on 110V? Curious as to how they do on the TIG side.

undercut
07-10-2012, 10:30 PM
Anyone use the 200D or the 160SX just on 110V? Curious as to how they do on the TIG side.

220v not an option for you at all? Not even plugging into a dryer plug?

BucketObolts
07-10-2012, 11:20 PM
Nope, just about all the dryers are gas down here. I'd need to get someone to run some 220V line.


220v not an option for you at all? Not even plugging into a dryer plug?

undercut
07-11-2012, 01:34 AM
Nope, just about all the dryers are gas down here. I'd need to get someone to run some 220V line.

In that case, what is the maximum amperage you can handle on the circuit you want to use?

sharpcreation
07-11-2012, 08:22 AM
Greetings all.
I am looking at getting a TIG machine in a few months (I hope). I am interested in a machine that is dual voltage as I don't have any 220V hook ups.
I am curious how well these do on 110V?
So far I have been using a Lincoln 135 mig machine with .030 flux. I have been please with the performance but not with all the clean up needed. Some of you might have seen some of my projects in the project section of this forum. So my thinking is if I have had good luck on a 110V wire feed I should have good luck on a 110V TIG machine. Am I pretty close assuming this or way out of the park?

Between the 200DX and the 160SX other than the 200 being DC only and the 160 having AC/DC what other differences is there? Looks like the 160SX is a fairly new machine only out for a few weeks. So far I have only welded stuff in the steel family. My luck is if I bought a DC only machine some aluminum projects would fall into my lap. :doh2
Does Longevity have any plans for other dual voltage TIG machines to be released in the next few months?

Any thoughts or help here would be appreciated.

Scott

I am also looking at getting the 160sx and have been doing a little homework and talking to a couple of pro welding buddies that I have (what I am working towards being)
What was suggested to me is to sit don and decide what I am going to be welding and what I want to be able to weld. That means types of material and thickness.

The 200D is a DC only TIG inverter. That means you can weld any type of materiel EXCEPT ALUMINUM. If you have no intentions of welding aluminum this machine will work for what you need.

The 160SX operates in both AC and DC, so it is a machine that will well all types of metal.

The next thing to think about is thickness of material you want to be able to weld, on both sides of the scale, thick and thin.

On the thick side:
200D has a max output of 200 amps tig, and 160, SMAW, which means 1/2 in single pass on TIG and 3/8 single pass on stick on all metals other than aluminum

The 160SX has a max of 160 amps on both TIG and stick... therefore approximately 3/8 thickness on steel and 1/4 on aluminum.

Now to look at the thin side...

That is where all the bells and whistles of the 200d will make a difference. Being able to pulse, control up and down slope, and the rest of the goodies will really help when welding the edges of thin sheet metal or razor blades... tight precise welds.

The 160SX, without all those options, relies more on the skill and patience of the person welding... sometimes it will work, other times it wont. This video really helps show how the pulse effects how your weld will come out a lot better than me typing it up on here.

TIG Welding - High Speed Pulse vs Slow - welding-tv.com (http://welding-tv.com/tig-welding-high-speed-pulse-vs-slow/)


Either way, both look like equally great machines, just a little different, just remember to think about what your going to and want to be able to weld, and get the one that fits you the best!

sharpcreation
07-11-2012, 08:36 AM
On a side note... if they made the micro tig in a 110/220 volt model I would defiantly save the extra for it!!!

undercut
07-11-2012, 10:49 AM
If you want to read material from the same guy who did the video, go here: Welding Tips and Tricks - TIG, MIG, Stick and a pantload of other info (http://www.weldingtipsandtricks.com/) Lots of good information. I guess video only websites are the current rage. I like the above website better as he doesn't always cover what he has written in his videos. If you don't have much time, you can cover a lot more written material than watching the videos - although his videos are pretty fun to watch. Cheers.

undercut
07-11-2012, 10:52 AM
... On the thick side: 200D has a max output of 200 amps tig, and 160, SMAW, which means 1/2 in single pass on TIG and 3/8 single pass on stick on all metals other than aluminum The 160SX has a max of 160 amps on both TIG and stick... therefore approximately 3/8 thickness on steel and 1/4 on aluminum. Now to look at the thin side... That is where all the bells and whistles of the 200d will make a difference. Being able to pulse, control up and down slope, and the rest of the goodies will really help when welding the edges of thin sheet metal or razor blades... tight precise welds. The 160SX, without all those options, relies more on the skill and patience of the person welding... sometimes it will work, other times it wont. This video really helps show how the pulse effects how your weld will come out a lot better than me typing it up on here. TIG Welding - High Speed Pulse vs Slow - welding-tv.com (http://welding-tv.com/tig-welding-high-speed-pulse-vs-slow/) Either way, both look like equally great machines, just a little different, just remember to think about what your going to and want to be able to weld, and get the one that fits you the best! Don't forget that maximum amp output is determined by the number of volts available from your house circuit AND your maximum amps from the outlet. You'll need much more maximum amps for 110v to make up for the fact that there is half the volts available compared to a 220v circuit.

BucketObolts
07-11-2012, 11:17 AM
I don't have a clue what my current wire specs are. I have been able to do all my projects with my Lincoln 135 using .030 flux. It seems to have plenty of power for the materials I have welded. 3/16 is about as thick as I have done. I have done some thicker stuff with multi-passes. So my thinking is if I can do all this with a 110V flux machine why not a 110V TIG machine?
My materials vary greatly from small screws to thick wrenches to ring gears. Most of the material I buy is 1/8 or 3/16. I would imagine 100-130 amps should be able to weld 3/16 mild steel.I rarely run long beads. Most of my projects are small beads of 1 inch or less. Most is just tacked together with many small tacks. So far all my welding has been in the steel family. Having a machine with AC would come in handy for alum. but I think for me that would be very, very rare.
Looking at the video having a machine with a variable pulse would be great. I have not held a TIG torch in about 13 years. I don't remember much about the settings and pulse rates.

undercut
07-11-2012, 11:35 AM
I don't have a clue what my current wire specs are. I have been able to do all my projects with my Lincoln 135 using .030 flux. It seems to have plenty of power for the materials I have welded. 3/16 is about as thick as I have done. I have done some thicker stuff with multi-passes. So my thinking is if I can do all this with a 110V flux machine why not a 110V TIG machine? My materials vary greatly from small screws to thick wrenches to ring gears. Most of the material I buy is 1/8 or 3/16. I would imagine 100-130 amps should be able to weld 3/16 mild steel.I rarely run long beads. Most of my projects are small beads of 1 inch or less. Most is just tacked together with many small tacks. So far all my welding has been in the steel family. Having a machine with AC would come in handy for alum. but I think for me that would be very, very rare. Looking at the video having a machine with a variable pulse would be great. I have not held a TIG torch in about 13 years. I don't remember much about the settings and pulse rates. From the product specs I've seen from various products / manufacturers, it looks like stick maxes out at about ~90 Amps under 110v with a 20Amp circuit. I suspect TIG would max out in around that area as well but it depends on how it has been designed. Don't take my word as gospel. You can get an idea what your circuit is capable of if you go to your fuse box and see what the fuse is rated for. 110v evens out the field for a lot of products as max amps begins to disappear as a differentiator.

Ryantowry81
07-11-2012, 03:06 PM
strictly speaking remember volts times amps equals watts. if you have a normal 110 circuit it is 15 amps if you have one of the plugs that accepts the side ways negative then there is a 20 amp. you can check the breaker too. most welders weld around 24v so with a 110Vx20amp system equals 2200 watts max, that means at 24v you can get to 91.6 amps, with a 100% efficiency through the machine and nothing else on the circuit. this is not possible. i would assume you are in the 75-80% eff range so even lower on 110v.

that being said if you want a 220/110 machine that still does ac/dc and a 200 amp max output on 220v then look at the 200sx not the 200dx.
http://i344.photobucket.com/albums/p357/ryantowry_81/2012-07-07160037-1.jpg
http://i344.photobucket.com/albums/p357/ryantowry_81/2012-07-07160010-1.jpg
i just got mine and am a novice welder so i cant comment on the performance other than it has worked for me so far on 220v, laid down a good stable arc and was easy to setup and use.
It does not have pulse or some of the more detailed settings but if you are a beginner like me then it should be fine. alot cheaper than the 200dx too.

would give you the same capability as the 160sx now with more output when you go to 220v in the future over the 160, and only about 200 more IIRC.

just my 2 cents.

undercut
07-11-2012, 03:25 PM
Thanks, Ryan. I wasn't sure what voltage was being used for TIG. I think Scott is trying to avoid putting in a 220v circuit. If he's using the welder for his creations, 110v should be good. He's not looking for load bearing welds. Short welds and tacks to keep things in place. Will avoid the cleanup associated with using flux core. Going DC only can save mucho bucks. Quite a few TIG ready, DC, 110v stick machines out there. I was looking at some in the $250 - $500 range.

Ryantowry81
07-11-2012, 04:39 PM
that is right for DC only it is alot cheaper than any ac/dc unit. lots of old blue and red DC only units on CL. awesome way to start if you are on a limited budget. harbor freight even has one, but i believe it is around 450 new.

and voltage can vary unit to unit but it is usually from 20-25v

sharpcreation
07-11-2012, 08:00 PM
From the product specs I've seen from various products / manufacturers, it looks like stick maxes out at about ~90 Amps under 110v with a 20Amp circuit. I suspect TIG would max out in around that area as well but it depends on how it has been designed. Don't take my word as gospel. You can get an idea what your circuit is capable of if you go to your fuse box and see what the fuse is rated for. 110v evens out the field for a lot of products as max amps begins to disappear as a differentiator.

I've never done any tests on this, but from what I understand tig usualy requires less volts for the same amps... more power efficient because of the lack of transfer of consumable to the weld... I think that is why you get more amp ratig from tig on a given machine than for stick.

Ryantowry81
07-12-2012, 08:55 AM
that makes sense chris beacuse some of your available wattage will go to the motors driving the wire, where as in a tig machine more wattage is directed to the electrode. both will have similar cooling loads at similar wattages.