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110/220???



Don Cook
06-03-2009, 07:48 PM
I finally got my LP-40D to working and it wouldn't cut 1/4 inch plate..just cut through about half way and spit slag in my face or off at an angle. SO, today I was reading a message on here and decided to use 220, what a difference, with 220 volts it goes through 1/2 inch plate like butter, slow but clean...I tried 1/4 inch plate and there is no slag, burrs or anything. What a beautiful machine. No way on earth would I part with it now...Thanks to Simon, my torch quit working and he got me another one in only one day...Simon,,,Thank you very much for the great and fast service....Long live Longevity:-D

Gadget
06-03-2009, 08:13 PM
Don,
Welcome to the forum. I have moved you into the registered users group so you can now post without needing post approval first.
Glad to hear your unit is working well. We have to take a lesson from Tim the toolman Taylor MORE POWER ARG ARG ARG :-D

Dan

KHK
06-03-2009, 09:03 PM
Welcome to the forum!!
Please post some photos of your projects.

technomitch
06-22-2009, 07:50 AM
I know what you mean . . . I was running mine on 110, but reiwred my small shop for 220. 40D cut like butter !! until I fried something :oops: !!

Don Cook
06-22-2009, 12:41 PM
Techno....what did you fry?? mine is working just fine and no problems at all. I did all the conversions and I even wired my shop..so I am curious what happened..was it the shop wiring, plug or inside the LP40D???? to cut thinner material, I have to cut down the amps to around 12 to 15 amps...I even can cut 1/4 inch with 30 amps and no slag or mess at all....Using 70PSI....

technomitch
06-23-2009, 07:18 AM
Sorry . . Re-read my post and it was a little confusing !! I ment to say that 220 is much better, Plasma was working like a charm . . sliced through 1/8 plate like butter. The next cutting job was a little further away from the plasma and I needed to lengthen the ground connection. I jury rigged a ground connection and that was when the plasma "poped" !!!

I was in a hurry, trying to finish up a project so I could go off-roading . . . My laziness. I am going to look at it tonight before LSU plays. We'll see.

robrob
10-25-2009, 09:48 AM
220 volt wiring used to freak me out but I was surprised to find how straightforward it really is. Adding a 220v outlet is easier than most people think.

bradler451
01-08-2010, 04:26 PM
two pull breaker done haha

Uncle Ed
01-08-2010, 04:43 PM
Where folks run into trouble is older homes (or lazy home owners) that wired the garage for only 110v 15A thinking they were just going to need a door opener and some lights.

I would have to beg people to pay the small amount to pull the extra wire to the garage. I mean the trench is dug, the conduit is laid - go for it. People are often short sighted. I prefer future proofing when possible and when difference in cost for the extra wire is tiny compared to the work already done it's really a no-brainer. I always run conduit for that reason as folks only start thinking about it after the job is completed and THEN they want the extra capacity.

Those of you with attached shops and garages have no excuse!

weldingtwopotatoes
01-08-2010, 04:46 PM
220 is much nicer but I’ve been surprised how well my machine works with 110. I use my 220 to 110 pig tail with my machine all the time. Having the 110 capability really comes in handy, especially if you ever want to take your machine to friend’s houses where 220 isn’t available.

Don Cook
01-08-2010, 04:49 PM
congrads, sure makes work a lot easier when hooked up right...what size wire did you use? and how far did you run it...I used a #10/3w ground... and run it about 60 feet to get closer to my welding area, but I have a 50 amp for my welder, I only use this one for my plasma cutter and wire welder....

arandall
01-08-2010, 06:32 PM
[quote=Grebbler;12697]Where folks run into trouble is older homes (or lazy home owners) that wired the garage for only 110v 15A thinking they were just going to need a door opener and some lights.

I would have to beg people to pay the small amount to pull the extra wire to the garage. I mean the trench is dug, the conduit is laid - go for it. People are often short sighted. I prefer future proofing when possible and when difference in cost for the extra wire is tiny compared to the work already done it's really a no-brainer. I always run conduit for that reason as folks only start thinking about it after the job is completed and THEN they want the extra capacity.

Grebbler:

You are dead right. I always try to future-proof" my projects - but then always think of something I should have done anyway!

Cheers,
Art R.

Hamstn
01-08-2010, 07:19 PM
Not always that easy or cheap thing to do but good advise. I grew up on an old farm and then moved to the other end of farm to an also old place and always remember the problems with power. Any way when I bought my own place the first thing I did was start new at the road and buried all new lines to all the buildings. Has always been nice to have good clean power anywhere it was needed and well worth the time and effort. Never go back to doing it half a$$ because things seem to always change at a later date.

Don Cook
01-08-2010, 10:19 PM
Amen.... my belief exactly... cut corners here and pay like mad later...I had a house in Jackson Ca. and built a 20 X 40 shop, when we sold, the buyer said he was going to use the shop for a play room and was going to have the sub-panel removed and all that "big" wire removed....I save him some money, I took it all and used it in my new home (shop)

Gadget
01-09-2010, 06:54 AM
Don, the only thing that could have been better with that transaction is if he had paid you to take the wire out. ;-)

bradler451
01-09-2010, 02:48 PM
Yes it probably is good to have that option of 240 or 110

Don Cook
01-09-2010, 05:11 PM
If you run 220, all you have to do is drop one hot line in your plug and you got 110 or 220 with no problem...What I do, is go to your nearest appliance dealer and ask if you can have the plug off the electric dryer they are going to take to the dump...just take a heavy duty knife and cut the cord off and you just saved your self $15.00..I usually have 4 or 5 laying around the shop just for that purpose.. you just have to remember what units are 220 and which are 110..

Firefightaz
11-24-2010, 06:07 AM
I don't quite have the settings dialed in yet with my new 220 outlet. I was producing cleaner more precise cuts running it off a 110. I am using it to cut 14, 16, and 18 gauge steel... Really thin stuff. I create metal silhouettes so the cuts have to be precise and clean.